1. Food

Your suggestion is on its way!

An email with a link to:

http://baking.about.com/u/ua/hintsandtips/share-your-opinion-Liqueur-Cakes-For-Kids.htm

was emailed to:

Thanks for sharing About.com with others!

You can opt-out at any time. Please refer to our privacy policy for contact information.

Readers Respond: At What Age Should Kids Be Allowed to Eat Cakes Made with Liqueur and/or Liquor?

Responses: 48

By

From the article: Bacardi Rum Cake
Gr540 asked a really good question in the forum. She wanted to know when is it a good time to allow children to have liqueur cakes.

I think it's up to the parents to decide whether or not, or when, their child can have some of the cake. Keeping in mind that with most liqueur cakes, the liqueur isn't cooked out, it's part of a glaze poured over a baked cake. These days kids are taught to be anti-alcohol and anti-drugs. So more than likely they won't want any of the cake anyway.

Alcoholism is a disease, not a choice...

In my family we all took sips of beer or whatever drink our parents happened to have and for most of us it was not a problem. Unfortunately, both of my parents had relatives who were alcoholics, which is an hereditary disease. Two of my younger brothers are alcoholics, one of them was hooked by the time he was 3. It's alcohol in the system that triggers the disease, and you don't know you have this disease until you honestly and seriously try to stop drinking and a have horrible physical reaction. If there is any chance that someone in the family could have that illness I believe they should be given every chance to grow up sober. And heres the thing, you may know there is no issue in your family so it's ok to let the kids have some, but sometimes kids have friends over - is it ok for their friends to have some? Would you want that responsibility? Not me.
—fabijean

May I totaly agree

May, I agree I have lived in or close to a U.S airforce base all my life. If we dont make such a big fuss ( like the Europeans) maybe we wont have as many alchohol problems in the U.s!!
—Guest unanamous

No way

Well, first of all, boiling an alcohol beverage only takes away 15% of the alcohol, and baking takes away 55%. So it wouldn't be smart to add wine to broth, or rum to cake.
—Guest Guest

Doesn't Cook Out

Alcohol doesn not cook out, the misconception comes from when you ignite a dish by adding alcohol, and the flame quickly dies down. Chefs assume the alcohol has cooked out, it hasn't about 90% will remain. If you boil the alcoho in a stew for about 3 hours, if will cook it down to about 1%. Of course as you will then realize, when you cook the alcohol out of the dish, it sits in the air in the house, which is why kids whose parents cook alcohol always think they have allergies, they have alcoho in their eyes they are not use to. Alcohol is bad for your health, of course giving your kids trace amount won't ruin their lives, however getting exposed to something you don't want to is always extremely annoying wether your a child or an adult.
—Guest hosch Walsh

What's the big deal ??

I don't get why this is such a big deal. In Europe, parent commonly let their teenagers have a glass of wine with dinner etc.. why are people in America so scared of a bit of alcohol.. lol
—Guest European

SERIOUSLY

how can ppl eat something they know so LITTLE about. Cake that is BAKED with rum or any other type of liquor is GONE by time the cook is ready to leave the over (unless you are purposely adding to much) children can eat it. Old tales of putting babies to sleep required LIQUOR so it is 100% fine. They are not getting drunk they are just simply having a slice of cake
—Guest proBAKERfor15years

Guest sa

Since wine is made of grapes, does it mean that kids should not eat grapes! I do not drink alcohol but let me have a piece of Rum cake.
—Guest Guest

No

When I was 12 my moms friends baked her a rum cake for her birthday a nd I ate too much... I felt sick and drowsy, my mom soon fiqured it out. So you probably shouldnt let your kids have some by that strory always makes me laugh!
—Guest June

Good Lord!

Whether it's evaporated or not, the amount of alcohol they get in a small slice is minimal at best. I have ALWAYS invited my children to taste my confections!! Now 14 & 9, they really don't prefer the taste. My daughter tasted the raw batter (oh no raw egg! Lol) & she turned up her nose. My son (14) says "This isn't going to make me drunk, is it Ma?" Haha. Let them enjoy the varieties, especially around the holidays, as you are creating innocent, life long memories for them--what could be better?? I have always tasted the alcohols in recipes as a child, and wine at the dinner table, and guess what?? I'm an very rare occasional drinker!! Go figure! Come on peeps, get real!!
—Guest Laura

alcohol in baking/cooking

Sorry to burst your bubble but alcohol DOES NOT get cooked out when baking cakes or adding to sauces/gravy the ONLY way the alcohol is removed is if you put a flame to it and burn it off, then and only then are you left with just the flavor. Stop getting sucked into the rumors.
—Guest Chef-Telling the truth

whatever!!!

My sis in law won't allow her kids to have any dessert with alcohol that isn't cooked. I say whatever, it's not like I'm giving them a glass and saying drink up hun! I will be making a butter rum cake as a birthday cake for Christmas this year and both of my children will eat a piece. I doubt my sis in law will allow her kids to have any. to each their own
—Guest Christy

Helicopter parents...

are screwing up their kids! Really people, the alcohol is cooked out and the flavor is what you get. Anyone who thinks their kid is going to get drunk or become an alcoholic from a piece of rum cake is a complete idiot.
—Guest Puhleeze

and the correct answer is . . .

I'm as careful and conservative as can be and I can tell you authoritatively that the alcohol in the batter bakes out and the alcohol in the drizzle IS the steam you see escape immediately when you add the rum. My mother made this cake and it is a winner. People freak out over how good it is. Try it! = )
—Guest definitiveanswer

what's the difference??

What's the difference between a rum cake and fruit cake? No one ever mentions the alcohol in fruit cakes? Unless my family is just weird, my grandmother makes her fruitcake around Tanksgiving and pours brandy over the top of it every other day and serves it at Christmas. I don't hear anyone fussing about the fruitcake!!
—Guest hollyberrietree

It's only the flavor!

The alcohol is cooked out. Seriously, I can't believe people don't know this.
—Guest Guest

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.